Tag Archives: training

Why German Shepherds Are The Easiest Dogs To Train

It may seem like German Shepherd Dogs are the easiest dogs to train, but it’s not as simple as that. Sure, the German Shepherd has a lot going for it when it comes to training, but they are also very independent dogs and some can be extremely difficult to train, especially the walking on a leash part as they do like to pull.

 

The main reason people think German Shepherds are the easiest to train is because they usually see them alert and sitting by the side of a police officer.  However, they are a great candidate for  training thanks to their history, because they were originally bred to herd cattle. They are extremely alert, agile and more than willing to learn, and they do need constant stimulation or they can become a house wrecker.

 

Most German Shepherd Dogs are pretty easy to train, they are up there with the most intelligent dogs and most of them will learn a new trick within 30 repetitions.  If you’re going to own a GSD, you should start training as soon as you get him home, as a puppy, don’t wait. Start with basic training, and if you’re not planning on him being a working dog, think about advance obedient training, because he’ll need a lot of commands to remember just to keep his brain stimulated.

 

They are originally working dogs, and still are, you find them in the police force, search and rescue, army and even guide dogs. Yes they can be easy to train but training for any dog isn’t easy, you have to be patient, persistent and continue training throughout their whole life. Always be prepared to teach him something new, as he’s always willing to learn something new.

 

German Shepherd Dogs can learn over 300 commands, and their energy levels and intelligence means you’re not going to have  a couch potato. Keep him stimulated with plenty of training, enter obedience competitions, or at the least, take him on long walks and runs, he needs the exercise. If you can’t give a German Shepherd Dog plenty of exercise and training, don’t get one, get a lapdog.

New German Shepherd Series

Hello everyone,

Starting from next week I will be writing a series of articles about the German Shepherd Dog. These articles will include health problems that the breed is prone to, like hip dysplasia and things we can do to help improve the condition. Moreover, I will be discussing other health problems and treatments as well as training, bonding, grooming and other related topics.

 

Tony

Dog Crates And Cages

When it comes to dog crates or cages, you want to buy the correct size for your breed of dog. Cages are not just for carrying or transporting your dog, but more importantly they are used for house training, and this method is referred to as crate training. Having said that, buying a cage that is too big for your breed will result in him sleeping at one end and using the other end as a bathroom, defeating the purpose of the training.

Small dogs especially do well with crate training, although just about every breed both large and small has had positive results, and quickly too, when using the crate training method. The idea of crate training is that a dog will not go to the bathroom where he sleeps, of course there will be accidents, but if you take him out before bedtime and again as soon as you wake up, he will pick it up in not time. Moreover, it won’t be long before he can go a full 7 hours or more before needing to go, because their metabolism slows when they sleep.

One should only use positive training methods when crate training, allow you dog to become used to the crate in his own time, slowly at first, maybe put a favorite toy in the cage and a favorite blanket. Don’t put him in the cage and walk away the first time, stay in the room with him and leave the cage door open until he gets used to it being his area or den. Moreover, you can slowly increase the time you leave him in the cage until he is completely comfortable with it.

Whatever type of cage you go for, be sure that there is enough room inside for him to stand, turn around and lay down, but not so big that he has a big empty space at one end. Smaller dogs will need smaller cages and large breeds may need several cages during their growing stages. Never put a dog in a cage with a collar on, because this can become a choking hazard.

The Prong Collar

The prong collar has had a fair share of publicity and reviews, some good and some bad. Having two German Shepherd Dogs of my own, I had the problem of them both wanting to pull my arm off when taking them for walks. I tried using positive training methods using treats to teach them the heal command but with no success, they were just too hyper and wanted to go everywhere except the direction I wanted them to go.

I searched youtube for some help on getting my dogs to walk along side of me, and came across one or two promoting the prong collar. I didn’t like the look of it and have heard that it is not a good product, but watching some videos I couldn’t believe this thing works as well as the video showed. At this point I also want to say that this product could be misused, and that is the worry of many comments on some of the videos I watched.

I decided to purchase one of these prong collars, and opted to go for the best one out there, which is german made I believe. Having said that, I thought I would give it a try and if I still didn’t like the idea then I could get a refund and send the thing back. Once it arrived I read the instructions carefully, many times so I wouldn’t get anything wrong, because it does actually look like an ancient torture device.

Once putting on one of my GSD’s I could not believe the results, my first dog was walking next to me within two minutes, and the collar didn’t bother him at all. It seems to work by the fact that the prong gently apply pressure if he pulls and stops, he doesn’t keep pulling because he would get hurt and he realizes this, so he just walks to however close you hold the leash. I decided to try it on my second GSD and again, to my surprise, he was walking by my side on the first attempt, amazing.

This is probably the first product that I’ve bought that actually does what its supposed to do. I don’t recommend this product unless you have a dog that you cannot get to heal trying all the other tested training methods. It does work, at least I’ve seen it work on many videos, and it worked excellent on my two dogs, but like I said, if not used correctly it can be abused or misused.

I am not sponsored by the makers or manufacturers of this product, it is just something I decided to try and so I thought I would share my findings. I will put a link up later to where you can buy one of these if you feel you need to try it out for yourself. It is a great product that, if used correctly, does exactly what it is supposed to do, but please try other methods first, and it is definitely not recommended for smaller dogs.

Tony

Things You Need Before Buying A Puppy.

Hello,

When the time has come and you have decided to buy your first puppy, there is a lot to consider, for instance, what type of dog will you get? Will it be a large breed or a small breed? Once you decide on what type of dog you will get, you will want to be prepared before you purchase your new puppy.

Being prepared ahead of time is always wise, and more so with a new puppy coming into the home, so what kind of things will you need to buy before going to pick up your new best friend? Let us look at the different things to consider buying before he comes home.

A good, comfortable bed for him to sleep on is a must, because he will need a spot in the home he can call his own.  Moreover, buying puppy food in bulk can be a good idea and often cheaper buying a large bag than smaller bags, although this depends on the size of the breed, larger bags usually work better as the dog gets older.  For puppies, always buy a good puppy food, but remember to switch to adult food once he has grown.

One also needs to get a good leash and collar, with a name tag so he can be identified if he wanders off.  Food and water bowls are important too, but stay away from plastic bowls because many have harmful chemicals in them.  Ceramic or metal food and water bowls are safest.

Toys are always an important part of a dogs life, because they need something to play with, and to chew on because you don’t want them chewing up your furniture, and they will chew, especially during teething.  Dental sticks can be a great way to keep their teeth in tip top shape, and have plenty of treats on hand for training.

Finally, be prepared to research the breed you’re looking for, because a large breed will need plenty of room. Moreover, be prepared if you are getting a breed that sheds a lot, or if you are going for a breed that sheds much less due to allergies. My two German Shepherd Dogs shed constantly, even though they say twice a year, they really do constantly shed, so we had to buy a good vacuum, lol.

Footnote:

If you are going to crate train be sure to purchase a cage that is not too big or too small, because this can be counter productive if the cage isn’t the right size for the dog.  Your dog should be able to stand up, turn around, and lay down in the cage, but having a cage too large can often result in him sleeping at one end and going to the bathroom at the other.